No 287

It never has been, in my remembrance, not as far as I can understand in the remembrance of any other Sixth T.B. To have any Holiday Task set at Whitsuntide Holidays but this year, May 10th 1844 Dr. Williamson gave us a subject as unusual “Nelsonis Columna” to compose a set of verses on by after the vacation; 3 weeks 3 days. And when reasoned with on the subject still persisted in his mistake. His answer was that “if a Holiday Task was not set, by me, it was so by accident, as it is quite usual to set a Holiday Task at Whitsuntide, as it is at any other time. The exemption from Holiday Task in the past of the QS is because they are obliged to stay over the 3 or 4 days for their Election”. Now Holiday Tasks in my humble opinion are under any circumstances, most disgraceful imposition on, but most especially in the present instance, where the master is decidedly making an innovation. I suppose now it will be continued, but I dare say not without another attempt to convince Dr. Williamson of his mistake.

J. Preston O.P.

No 281

Soon after the Bartholomewtide Holidays a fellow by name G.O. Edwards, being detected smoking in a Tobacconists shop by Williamson, he was accordingly put down 4 places in his Election, & also received a long imposition. Several other instances have late by occurred; the first on record is, I believe, No 103 of this Ledger. G.O. Edwards was however restored after Xmas 1844.

No 267

I shall here take it upon me to relate an incident wh. though trivial in itself may nevertheless be deemed worthy of insertion. It chanced that 2 of the smaller Townboys, Nicholson and Chambers having quarrelled resolved to end their differences in the Fighting Green. Whilst the Fight was going on a man by name Owen; who called himself the Head Constable, chose to come down and endeavour to put an end to the fight; but we, conceiving he had no right to interfere pushed him and 2 of vergers by whom he was attended out of the Green, whilst one of the Queen’s Scholars emptied the contents of a pitcher full of water over his person, upon wh. he withdrew and the fight went on. But not long after he came again, and being again defeated in his attempts to interrupt the fight, he departed and informed Williamson, upon whose approach we were obliged to decamp, and the fight of course was stopt. Williamson took no further notice of it than by making the combatants shake hands, and thus put an end to the matter.

Wm Spurway
Prin. Opp.

No 265

At the beginning of the Summer half 1842 Williamson made the following new rules –

1st That all home boarders should go to the Abbey with the boarders every Saints Day.

2d That if a Saints Day should fall on a Saturday or Monday there shd be no leave out on those days i.e. No leave out till after church on Saturday & till 10 o’clock on Monday morning.

3dly That the Easter Holidays shd be taken away except Good Friday.

4thly To make amends for these holidays being taken away the half should always commence on the Thursday instead of the Monday as formerly, there by giving us an extra 3 days at the end of every holidays.

N.B. The 5th of November & Ash Wednesday will remain holidays as usual.

W.G. Andrewes
Prin. Opp.

No 263

March 1 – 1842

A quarrel between the TB & QSS which lasted some time began this day in consequence of Beasley a Bishops’ Boy in the Sixth having licked a Second Election.*

The facts are as follows –

The Captain* having head that this fellow in the 2d Election has been licked, sent to Beasley saying that he wished to speak to him. He went accordingly alone and unarmed, not the least suspecting what the QSS were about to do. When he arrived at College doors the Captain met him & hit him several times with a stick. Most of the QSS were there ready as they said afterwards to set on Beasley if the Captain had not been sufficient of himself with his stick to lick his unarmed enemy whose only offence was wearing a purple gown instead of a black one. But Beasley seeing about 30 to 1* thought it better to refer to Williamson at once & after a great deal of palaver & bother it ended in the Captain sending an apology to the Head of the T.B. Peace was now nominally restored, but the QSS refused to have Beasley in the boat which was to race with Eton which again occasioned a deal of quarrelling & letters were sent to Eton to say that the boat which was preparing to race them was not the Westminster proper boat unless Beasley rowed in it.
Several letters appeared in Bell’s Life upon the subject but as Beasley was taken ill about a week before the reach took place it at once put an end to any doubt concerning his rowing in the boat.

W.G. Andrewes Prin. Opp.

* W.K.R. Bedford, but who stepped in [&] impeded him whilst running after some other Boy.
G. Preston

It was not however Bedford’s fault at all that this disgraceful occurrence came to such a height, but of some other Under Election.

* He had offered to fight anyone of them on the spot, singly, but as in all probability they did consider themselves a match whilst alone, they preferred the unfair and disgraceful way related here.

No 240

On the “Chairing day” before Whitsuntide, 1840, an event occurred, which, as it maybe useful or entertaining to those who may hereafter read this Ledger, I have thought right to notice.  Mr Bentall, usher of the fifth, who, either deservedly or not, had been for some time past very unpopular amongst the fellows in general, having been hissed for some years past on the same occasion, and fearing a repetition of it this year, asked Williamson to use his authority in order to prevent it.  In consequence, on the afternoon of that day Williamson (with Bentall), happening to meet several TBs and KSs walking down to the water, stopped them and gave public notice, that whoever hissed, or caused to hiss, Bentall, would be immediately expelled.  Upon this, the fellows, who, had not before much idea of hissing, gave it up, as it was thought, entirely.  The first and second rounds, none, or hardly any, hissing took place; and the fellows only laughed at him, as he was standing at the window.  The third round, however, Lambard and Ogle, 2 third election fellows, with Merewether and Cocks, 2 second election, either heated with wine, or from some other cause, hissed and abused him for some time as loud as possible.  Bentall, who of course distinctly saw them, called them all in to his house, and declared his intention of showing their names up to Williamson.  He also called in Richards, a senior and some others, saying that they ought not to have allowed the fellows to hiss him.

At first some fears were entertained for the fellows, but on going into school next morning; it was only supposed that they would have a heavy imposition.  Immediately after prayers, however, Williamson called up Ogle and Lambard, charged them with hissing, and abusing Bentall; and ended by sending for the monitor in order to flog them.  Upon ordering Ogle (as first in his election) to take off his college waistcoat &c he refused, not wishing to cast such disgrace on his election.  Lambard followed his example, notwithstanding they were urged to the contrary by Williamson, on account of their being on the foundation.  They continued to refuse and were in form expelled by Williamson from school he hitting them both across their shoulders with the rod, as they were walking down!  The fellows of course were much astonished, being taken by surprise, though, after the public notice that Williamson had given the evening before, it must be confessed that it was not much a matter of surprise.  Ogle, however, was sent back by his father to receive, unavoidably, a flogging.  Williamson nevertheless, denying the same privilege to Lambard, (if indeed he had been so inclined), alledging his previous bad character as a reason. Merewether and Cocks, being under elections, were flogged.

It is much to be regretted that the fellows should have been induced to hiss Bentall as passing by his windows in silent contempt (if he deserved it) in contrast to the cheers which they bestowed on Grant’s would have annoyed him quite as much as any noisy mark of disapprobation and it is to be lamented that they did not consider that in its present alarmingly low state; Westminster could ill bear their expulsion.  It ought to be mentioned that the year before, some fellows that hissed Bentall had only 150 lines to learn.  The difference of the punishments, may be accounted for by the notice which Williamson gave on the previous afternoon.

M.F. Osborn Prin. Opp.

No 221

In consequence of the Etonians having been defeated last year at Datchet Bridge they again challenged us to row them. The preliminaries having been all settled at the Eton Montem by the respective Heads of the Water, it was agreed by both parties that the Race should take place Tuesday July 31st (the Match day) the Etonians breaking up on the Monday preceding… It was also agreed that the intended Race should be kept a profound secret as Williamson was known to be hostile to Boat racing. Notwithstanding all our caution a paragraph appeared in the Bell’s Life Newspaper stating that “A match was to be rowing between Eton and Westminster from Westminster Bridge to Putney July 31st and by this or some other means our Purpose became known to Williamson. In the 1st School on Monday morning Williamson sent for the Captain and told him he understood that it was our intention to row the following day and as it was contrary to all Rules of the School he must insist on our giving a pledge not to row or that he must take his own measures to stop it. Upon the Captain’s refusal to give any such pledge he immediately commenced proceedings by stopping the early play for the next day (the Match day) and by ordering the Q.S. to be locked up at ¼ before 7. During 6th lesson on Tuesday he told us (the 6th) that we must attend a Mathematical lecture in School from 11 ½ to 1 and again from 5 till 7 after afternoon lockers. However, in the course of some conversation with him it was discovered that the pledge required was only “not to row on the match day” which pledge was accordingly given and therefore we conceived ourselves at liberty to row that evening. However during lockers Williamson sent for the head of the T.B. and the Captain and told them that any boy who rowed in a match with Eton would be severely punished. But the Eight being determined at all hazards to row at 5 o clock sallied forth. But unfortunately 3 of the crew having to go to Williamson to say some imposition he took this advantage to detain 2 of them there till far too late to think of rowing this added to the circumstance that the Fathers of 2 of the crew came down to Westminster during the afternoon and expressly forbid their sons to row in the match entirely broke up the Crew. But determined not to disappoint the Etonians we offered to make up the boat again and row them which they very generously refused saying that it would be no honour then for them to beat us. Betting was 6 to 4 on the Westminsters. The Crew was as follows –

Cocks
Coxe
Hodgson
Pollock
Green
Farrer
Richards
Randolph

Maule – Steerer

For further particulars vide Water Ledger

No 207

In consequence of a dispute having arisen at the Revd J Bentalls Boarding house (concerning the propriety of locking boys up in their rooms) and some of the fellows having by consent of the Head Master changed their boarding house the following Rules were established

1st That any fellow in the 6th changing to a house where a Shell fellow was head should immediately become Head of the House.

2nd But if to a house where a fellow (lower in the 6th than himself) was head he should wait 6 months before he became Head of the House.

G.F. Bentinck Prin: Opp.

These Rules were agreed to by the 6th Form November 1837