No 182

On the 9th of December being the 2d play night, the annual 6th Dinner was held at the Café de L’Europe in the Haymarket where it was held last year. It was very inferior and exorbitantly dear. So few fellows were in the 6th it was found necessary to ask of the Upper Shell

The list of the 6th at Christmas 1835

*J R Turner
C.D. Obsorn
* F Turner
* H Lee
* A McKenzie
BG Astley
J D’Oyley

Those marked * are Homeboarders

C.D. Osborn HB

No 181*

In consequence of the daily decreasing state of the school both in number and size, and the bad effects these evils entail on the power and importance of the fellows themselves I have thought it right to give a few reasons for this, which have fallen under my notice during my stay at Westminster. In order to warn the future possessors of this book, (as much as it is in my power) against the continuance of these abuses or the formation of fresh ones. The principal reason (as I conceive) of this much to be lamented decrease in the school are 1st the expense of education at Westr and the great cheapness of it at other small schools (district and others) and this too acting upon, the low state of the landed interests, which combined, either entirely prevent a certain class of individuals* from sending their sons to school at all, or else induce them to give the preference to cheaper establishments. To this may be also added the overstocked state of professions which oblige the above mentioned class of persons, to choose inferior situations for their sons, and which need comparatively little or no education, these reasons and the immense increase of schools of all kinds, and the multitude of private tutors throughout England, as well as the rapid march of puritanism in all classes (which induces those afflicted with its tenets to commit their sons to the charge of clergymen of their own opinions) will account of the decrease in numbers of the school. Now let us trace the effects of that paucity of numbers upon the school. 1st the decrease in physical force on the part of the fellows must necessarily diminish their authority and necessary successful resistance to infringements on the part of the masters. 2dly the scarcity of fellows gives the Ushers and Masters more time to examine individually into the proceedings of each boy * and thereby to have more hold of him than he otherwise would have. 3dly The great scarcity also prevents the so close union between the different bodies of the school (viz Home Boarders, King Scholars and Boarders) as is absolutely necessary in order to pressing ahead against the innovations of masters. For as there are fewer fellows, any broil between even two boys of different bodies maybe productive of an estrangement of the whole set, whereas in the fuller state of the school such petty disagreements would pass unnoticed. I will now conclude with urging the proverb so universally adopted at the French Revolution, and which maybe better applied to a conservative subject ‘Union is Force’. Let the school (small as it is) unite together in a common cause, to resist innovations, maintain the most trifling rules, and stand up for their own rights, and I do not yet despair of seeing better times dawn on Westminster which desirable object and “consummation so devoutly to be wished” will never be attained without these precautions and now should future readers lay to m charge any vanity in laying down this advice, let them attribute it to my ardent desire for the welfare of the school, and my dread of its entire ruin.

C.D. Osborn
H. Boarder

* I mean the better sort of tradesmen and others of a like stamp.

* Every person who has any regard for their sons, must think, that the more they are looked after, the better; That, therefore, which is here pointed out as a fault, is on the contrary, a very great advantage.

Added by B.G. Astley

No 181b

On Saturday August 1st the annual Grand Match between the TB and KS was played. It continued pretty even during the first innings, when the KS were only a mere trifle in advance – But the dinner being between their second innings and our own – the juice of the grape told against some of the TBs and they were defeated. The names of the players were –

TB
C.D. Osborn
Bromley
Whittaker
Vardon
Vialls
Smith Junr
Merewether
Onslow
Boyce
Lee*
Turner*

KS
Taunton
Ellison
Gray
Balston
Drew
Smith
Barnes
Howard
Fielde
Andrews
Page

Those marked * are homeboarders.

It also must be observed that the TB were deprived of some of the best players on their side viz

Ld March
B.G. Astley
McKenzie
Burdett
Ld J Lennox

By the Scarlet Fever and other accidents unforeseen and unexpected.

C.D. Osborn
Head Boarder

No 181

On Wednesday the 22d (Friday being the day preceeding a saints day) the annual match was played between the Town Boys who had not played in the Grand Match the preceeding year and the Lamprobatics in which the former were beaten in one innings. The following is a list of the players.

TB
C.D. Osborn
B.G. Astley
McKenzie
Mereweather
Burdett
Vialls
Smith Junr
Somerset
Onslow
Boyce
Richards Junr

KS
Drew
Balston
Fielde
Barnes
Dickenson
Butler Senr
Andrews
Ellison
Tritton Junr
Robinson
Barnes Junr

There not being sufficient time on Wednesday it was finished the following day when two of the TB were absent C.D. Osborn and McKenzie

C.D. Osborn
H Boarder

No 180

The names at the fields and in Dean’s Yard at ½ past seven at the former place and ¼ past eight in the latter which Williamson had abolished last year were this year reinstituted on account of the dinner at Putney on the occasion of the intended race (mentioned (168) and given at length in the Water ledger) last year.

C.D. Osborn H Boarder

No 179

Williamson having proposed as a subject for an English Prize poem a translation of the chorus in the Hecuba several fellows tried for it and the best exercise being declared by Williamson to be that shown up by a Townboy, it was of course expected that he would have the prize, but in the interval the Townboy having got into some row Williamson refused to give him the prize though it was understood to be unconditional. He at the same time gave prizes for the 2nd and 3rd best translation both done by King’s Scholars. This is recorded here as a lasting monument of Williamson’s good faith and as an encouragement to Townboys in future to exert themselves. I may as well also mention that *Bishop Burton left a sum of money to buy an annual prize for Townboys but which prize has never been given, Mr Williamson perhaps finding the funds of the school in the low state to which he by his bad management has reduced it insufficient for himself and friends.

C. Bewicke Head Boarder

* This ought to be Francis Burton Esq who left £5 per anum for the purpose before mentioned.

Added by C. Bewicke Head Boarder

The Townboy alluded to was Bewicke himself, his modesty probably having prevented his mentioning the circumstance.

Added by C.D. Osborn HB

No 176

Ditch-leaping was this year, in order to lull the suspicions of the master, deferred to March 17th when this ancient custom was kept up by a large assemblage of fellows. In consequence of there being names at 11 o’clock (as usual on early plays) we were much hurried, and the KS fearful of being late returned sooner than usual having gone about half the usual distance. But the T.B. with great spirit determined to go the usual round which they accomplished in excellent time.

C. Bewicke HB