No 26

Hardly a week had elapsed after the last row when Scott asked me to inquire among the fellows, about a thermometer of his which he had lost from its place by his desk up school. Now it happened that a boy named T had been seen with a thermometer the night before the loss of Scott’s was perceived. I of course turned to him first, & asked where his thermometer was.  He said that he had broken the bulb to get the mercury. I told him to bring me the wooden part, which he declared he had lost, but afterwards produced. There was only one other in the house, so I took them both up school & tried them in the place where Schott’s had been. One only fitted. That was T–‘s. I then asked him where he had got it from. He said that he had brought it from home, that his father had bought it 2.day!! & given him one. This was a palpable lie, so I took the thermometer to Scott, who immediately identified it. T– was sent for & after telling several lies at last confessed to have taken it down to look & to have been afraid of putting it back, for fear any should see him. Scott flogged him in the library, merely for telling lies, judging, & I think fairly, that he intended to put it back, only had not the moral courage. This is another instance of the gentlemanly spirit which exists at Westminster at the present day.

E.R. Dowdeswell

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No 25

For more than a year past, fellows in this house have from time to time been losing money, from their drawers, purses, etc. Just this time last year there was one of these rows shown up to Marshall. Everything was done to find out the culprit, but in vain. Of course, someone was suspected and when he went into college we congratulated ourselves on having got rid of the thief. We were however mistaken & ever since then money has been going in a most serious way, so much so that I became almost certain that is was none of our fellows in this house, but either some of the next house, who could have got in at the windows, or some of the servants. At length, about three weeks ago, one of the fellows losing continually small pieces of money from his purse determined to mark it. This he did. The bait was taken. On it being missed, I sent for everyone’s keys to fit his drawer, none however fitted, so I sent for everyone into Chiswick & made them produce all their money. At length* William’s fag, B. was called in & to our surprise produced the marked sixpence, evidently without the least suspicion. This I did not take as proof positive, but cross-examined him severely. The course of which he declared, upon his honour, that Sutcliffe had given it him in change & carefully enunciated what he had spent, & on what. I had spoken to “Mother Crowther” about the maids, and my suspicion of the maids, and about one in particular. She (Mrs. C) told this maid, who, naturally, came to me saying that I had calumniated her, & was very much mistaken. I of course begged her pardon, & was in fact very sorry for suspecting her, but was driven to circumstances that I could not help myself. I then went in to Marshall, & told him all I knew of the case. He sent for B, who confessed to him to have taken money from William’s drawer 4 separate times & twice from another fellow’s. Marshall of course went to Scott, who pronounced the sentence to be expulsion. Now the thief’s brother was very much liked in the house, & his father and his mother were both ill. We therefore thought the sentence rather severe. We racked our brains to think of something that would punish as effectively without hurting the feelings of his parents & friends. We accordingly (I think at the wish of the whole house) went to Scott to beg him to reconsider the sentence & proposed to him a medium to flog him, & then only rusticate him for a year. But to our surprise Scott turned to the other extreme & after flogging him only rusticated him to the second of the half (3 weeks). So we shall have the young blackguard back here next half & we half repent ever having gone up to Scott about him. So ended this particular row & again we congratulated ourselves that we were free from this horrible mystery which had thrown a gloom over the house so long.

*Mr Williams it was who had lost the money. I call the thief B. not wishing to mention names

E.R. Dowdeswell

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No 23

Albert Edward, Prince of Wales, came of age on Sunday the 9th of Nov., but owing to it being on a Sunday it was kept all over the Kingdom (except Westminster) on Monday. That is we did not keep it properly. It being Monday we of course expected leave till 10. This we did not get, so I went with Phillimore (captain) to Scott after breakfast to demand an early play: he would not hear of it, but said he would look at the “Papers” & see if it was to be kept here. We were not content, & went to him a second time, armed with the “Times” which gave notice that all the abbey and two government offices were to suspend business for the day in honour of the Prince’s birthday. He was of course obliged to yield but only gave a half holiday & that with very bad grace. It was very shabby of him, for it is not every year that a Prince of Wales comes of age. In fact it is more than 80 since George 4th arrived at the age of manhood. However, we will hope that when the next Prince of Wales comes of age, the majority may be kept with more loyalty at Westminster & that the School (being a Regia Schola) may be permitted to rejoice, in a sensible way, at any blessing which befalls the Royal Family.

E.R. Dowdeswell

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No 21

At a meeting of “Elizabethans” on Thursday 30th the following business was transacted:

Phillimore and Yates QSS (who had [receded?] from the club last half) were re-elected as members of the Elizabethan Club.

I That in future all members be entirely equal. No notice being taken of their position in the school. That the words “Townboy” & “Queenscholar” being considered unparliamentary (when used with reference to members of the Club) in order that jealousy between the two orders in the club may in some degree be put to a stop.

II That since all members are equal any member may be elected president (to the abolition that the original rule that a senior only might be president).

III That meetings be held once every month of oftener at the direction of the President.

E.R. Dowdeswell

   Prin. Opp.

*I find that on looking back the “Elizabethans” have not before been mentioned, so I will give a short account of the club from its first foundation. The club was started by some Q.S. in 1861 under the name of “The Bonding Bricks”. It was intended to be exclusively a Queen’s Scholars Club but by degrees one or two Town Boy’s were admitted, with simply a nominal membership since they had no role in any matter, were not permitted to hold any office in the club, or to propose or second any one a member. Things went on smoothly since we did not care for any of their honours and most of us alluded the dinner on Election Tuesday (101). The next lot of seniors however made a great change. The name was changed to the more gentlemanly one of ‘Elizabethans” & we were placed on the footing we now occupy as all equal.

Added by:

E.R. Dowdeswell

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No 20

The Athletic Sports came off on Wednesday and Thursday the 22nd & 23rd October. The weather had been very strong for some days before, but luckily cleared up enough to let us have a good day’s fun. The running was much better than last year’s, the judging perhaps not quite so good. O’Brien Q.S. won the 3 best prizes.* (The mile, hurdle race, & a mile with hurdles.) Williams T.B. won throwing the cricket ball & hammer. Chepwel Q.S. won the high jump & jump with pole. Yates Q.S. long jump etc. etc. for further particulars inside “Athletic Sports Ledger.” (under the care of the secretary).

E.R. Dowdeswell

   Prin. Opp.

*Mrs Scott kindly presided at the presentation of prizes

H. Steward & E. O. Bernes Esqs. (Old West) officiated as starter and judge

No 18

At a meeting of the whole Upper School, it was determined that the “athletic sports” should come off this year, again, and the following were elected to act as the committee of management:

W. Phillimore (captain), E.R. Dowdeswell (Prin. Opp.), G.H. Pember Q.S, W.W.C. Lane Q.S, W. Hunt T.B, W.B. Besley Q.S., Q. O. Williams T.B.

The committee appointed, Phillimore Treasurer & President, & Lane secretary.

E.R. Dowdeswell

Prin. Opp.

No 17

The Townboy & Queen’s Scholars cricket march was played on Monday the 4th of August, which ended in favour of the Queen’s Scholars though our eleven played capitally. The T.B. went in first & made 60 runs to which total Hunt contributed 12 (the highest score). The Q.S. made 70 only, the highest score of the innings being 18 (Yates’). Dowdeswell T.B. for most catches (2). Chapman T.B. got the stumps for most wickets bowled (6). The elevens were as follows:

T.B. Q.S.
A.      Preston A.      White
J. Short J. Gates
W. Giles W.C. Lane
G. Dowdeswell E. Bird
G. Huwdenson W. Meyrick
J. Chapman G.T. O’Brien
W. Hunt J.C. Chefwell
H.N. Monk A.J. Mackey
B.N. Thomas A.      Downes
Q.O. Williams G. Pember
A.W. Hammon H. Walker

E.R. Dowdeswell Prin. Opp.