No. 3

Revd T.W. Weare having kindly sent a “Badge” to be fenced for each year and held by the winners till the following […], the first holder was decided today, April 7 1862. There were twelve entries but owing to the short time allowed this year for practice, the good fencing was confined to a few couples – the Gymnasium, which, not yet having been fitted up, is […] & S[…] was selected for the place of contest. The prize was eventually won by Gumbleton Captain of the Q.S.S.

Anselo, the fencing master, was present to see fair play.

W. Winters

Prin. Opp.

* Rvd. Weare gave some rules with his “Badge” which I have only just manage to get. They are too long for mention here, so I have had them written out & a copy is to be kept in the box with the ledgers etc.

Added by E.R. Dowdeswell Prin. Opp.

1863

No 578

Two of the masters Rev. Weare and Bonney the mathematician master left at the end of the Midsummer term and were presented with each a testimonial by the T.B. Weare with a coffee service, and Bonney with a silver inkstand. Rev. W. Ingram O.W. has taken Weare’s place as second master and a Mr Scriven. Bonney’s Yr remain: to be seen how they will be liked.

J. L. Swale

Prin. Opp.

No 502

Fri. April 4th.) Rev. T. W. Weare, the Under Master, who has since Liddell left Westminster, made it his business to interfere in every possible way with everybody else’s, chose to give in imposition to a Sixth T.B., Maples, a thing which no master can do up school or down, but the Headmaster. The imposition was given for a trifle, which has nothing to do with the case. Going down school, Mr Weare in his benevolence kindly told Maples that he would excuse the imposition. Maples, not being particularly affected by such magnanimity, made no reply; at which Weare got angry; Maples told him the imposition was given in the beginning for nothing (too truly), at which Weare doubled the former imposition. I went with him (M.) to Scott’s house (who had not been at prayers) & explained the matter; but Scott quietly listened to me & then refuted (!!) me by saying that there was no proof that such was the rule of the school, & when I referred to Mr Weare’s own mouth (See the bottom of the third Page no. 399) Scott said there was nothing to prove that Murray had not misunderstood Weare. Against such argument there is no use reasoning. Scott finished by saying that he should give me a written rule to put in the Ledger, to the effect that every master in the school has authority over everyone in whatever form, or house. In that case we should have six Masters, excluding French &c., allocating probably without knowing what the other were about. The way in which Weare is “loved and respected” (to use his term) is not at all different from before. The Q.S. fear him on account of their elections, & hate him. The following is the new rule

In absence of the Head Master no boy in the VIth form whether Q.S. or T.B. is entitled to claim any exemption from the authority of the other Masters of the school in respect of impositions &c.

(Signed by C.B. Scott)

It is not in our power to do anything against this rule; though it is against all precedent. But I hope that whoever is Head Town Boy when we next have a new Headmaster will represent the matter to him, in order that this rule may be annulled.

A.F. Pope

Pr. Opp.

No 475

The other morning Liddell called me up and said he was surprised to hear that Bishop’s Boys were not considered TBs, nor allowed to exercise authority over them (TBs) as Pr. Opp. when above any other TB in the Sixth, at the same time saying that when he made the BBs leave off their purple gowns, he then placed them on the same footing as TBs – I argued with him some time, and showed many instances where BBs , though above any TBs in the Sixth, yet, were not considered Pr. Opps. He summed up by saying that he should see Weare (the Under Master and an Old Westminster) about it. He has not spoken to me since counting it, and thus, I suppose, ends the matter; but I hope that all future Pr. Opp. Will not surrender up his or any other TB Ledger to any Bishops Boys.

J. Gray Pr. Opp.

No 434

Weare the other day called Twiss the captain up to him, and told him he would be much obliged to him, if he (Twiss) and Berens would do all in their power to get up the Eleven. Lord Paget had asked for an early play, but Liddell said the Eleven was so bad, it was not worth Lord Paget’s while to bring down an eleven. Rather odd of the Masters asking two of the Eight to get up the Eleven.

R. B. Berens
Prin. Opp.

No 433

On our return this half June 10th we were extremely sorry to find that Marshall Master of the Shell was prevented, by severe illness, from attending to his form, and that he would not return for some time. Rev. Weare attended to the house for a short, and when the Oxford men came up Rev. G Marshall kindly superintended his brother’s house and Lloyd took the Shell.

R. B. Berens
Prin. Opp.

No 414

On Monday (July 8th/51) we had a race with an old Westminster crew, from Battersea bridge, to Putney. It was a splendid race our crew being beaten by half a boat’s length. We had originally arranged to row on the Thursday previous, but the old Westr crew not being able to get together on that day, we chose Friday. On asking Weare’s leave however, the objected to it on the score that Saturday was confirmation day, so in spite of the earnest wishes of both crews to row, we were compelled to defer it to some indefinite period. It came off however on Monday without the knowledge of the masters. For particulars vide Water Ledger.

J Murray
Prin. Opp.

No 399

At the end of last half (Xmas ’50) a very unpleasant melée took place between the T.B.s and QS.  As it had for a long time been the custom to tan the T.Bs, as they ran up to the gods on the play nights, I spoke to the captain (Blagden) about it some time before the play, and he promised me it should be discontinued.  When however the T.Bs went to try the gods, several were licked, and when I spoke to Blagden he again assured me it was contrary to his orders, and that he wd tan those QSS who had touched the TBs I was quite satisfied with this , and on the first play night all went off very quietly – On the second play night several TBs were standing round the College doors waiting to be admitted, and I went to speak to some of them, when to my great surprise I met a QS running after some fellows, who had managed to screw themselves into the doorway, with a knotted rope I stopped him and told him that the Captain had promised me there shd be no tanning, but he said he knew what had been told him, and refused to tell me what that was.  Upon this I went away, and fetched all the sixth fellows, and steward who was in the Upper Shell, and we agreed to stop the tanning, if any were intended.

We did not however say anything, but kept ourselves in the background, to be ready for any emergency – In the meantime I had to speak to one of the seniors, but failed and soon after it struck six.  The T.Bs then began to go up, and we saw the two QSS who kept the first bar, make them stoop down and go under the bar instead of through it, and repeatedly strike them – We then thought fit to interfere, and a rush was made wch ended in the two QSS getting bowled over, and the whole bar with its appendages coming down.* Some of us then ran all the way up to the gods, and saw the smaller TBs safely up – All the sixth fellows then went to dress but on presenting ourselves at the first bar we found that the Captain had given orders that none shd be admitted.  I insisted on being allowed to speak to Blagden, and at last managed to gain access to him, but he refused to listen to me, saying we had all behaved in a blackguard manner, and that he shd show the whole thing up to Weare the next morning.  I then said I wd have all the TBs down, but some of the sixth TBs asked me to wait ten minutes while one of them spoke to another of the seniors to try and arrange it amicably.  Before that time had expired, Liddell came in and what with the noise of the band and the clapping, and the crush of people, it was impossible to get the “gods” down.

Next morning Weare sent for me, and the Captain, and two monitors, and in a stern voice asked what complaint I had to make; I said I did not come to him to complain of anything, but that he had sent for me.  He then cross-examined me upon the events of the previous night, taking down all I said on paper and abusing me the whole time.  He then sent me out of his house and told me to send in another sixth T.B.  I went straight to Liddells, and showed up the whole thing and said I thought Mr W. was not doing the T.B’s justice, and he told me to send Mr W. to him.  I then went back to Weare’s house and he told me he thought fit on acct of my very injudicious conduct to prohibit me from going to the third play – I angered him by telling him that it hadn’t been my intention either to go myself or let any T.B go and finally exasperated him, when, upon his declaring he wd report me to the Head Master I told him I had just been and showed the whole affair up.  The two bar holders  were then had in and severely punished and the whole of us dismissed from the august presence of Mr Weare.  In the afternoon, L and Whitaker and myself sent to Mr W and when he made me a kind of apology and acknowledged he had no right over the TBs.

He behaved I think very unhandsomely to say the least of it, for he abused me before the QSS, and made it up when they were not present.  The next morning great was the silence that prevailed along the sixth side of the school, nobody conversing above a whisper, and as we were going down school Blagden told me he wished to speak to me.  He said he was extremely sorry it had ever occurred, and that he had thought it best to show it up to Weare, for fear either of us, being each prejudiced in favour of our own party, shd not do one another justice, and finished with ‘hoping to see us at all at the play, and offering his hand, wch I of course took and so the affair was finished.  Afterwards Liddell had Austen and myself with the Capt and monitors to his house and said he was sorry anything had happened to disturb the general harmony, and when he had sent the QSS away he told me he thought I had been rather hasty and that I ought to have gone to Weare at once instead of getting up a row.  Liddell of course spoke like a gentleman, but Weare quite the contrary, and I am not surprised at the dread of him and dislike wch all the QSS exhibit, and wch is not less felt by those unlucky fellows who are in the under school.

In the evening, we all went to the Play and parted in friendship with all the QSS.  I think this has done the TBs good, as it will show we are resolved to make a stand against the supremacy of the QSS and my thanks are due to * all the sixth and upper shell who so willingly backed me on this occasion.  I may perhaps have been too hasty, yet I do not see what else I cd have done, and I think that all T.Bs who read this acct will agree with me.

Jan 4 / 51

J. Murray Murray
Princeps Oppidanus

* I have since heard that the QSS have always boasted that no TBs have ever invaded college, and in fact still do so.  Let this contradict them –

*The following is a list:

6th

Murray
Whitaker
Milman
Berens
Waterfield
Henty

Up. Sh.

F. Steward

No 337

There was soon after the Xmas holidays a misunderstanding between the TBs & QSS. which nearly ended in serious consequences to one of the QS. a TB home boarder in the fifth having been sent for by a QS to come into the green of a Saturday morning refused & he alleged as excuse that the junior who was sent wanted to make him come on his (the junior’s) own authority. On the following Monday he was kept up School and licked & that severely by several of the seniors on his returning home to breakfast his mother contrary to the boys’ own wish started immediately and showed the affair up to Liddell. I was out on leave at the time ie. the Saturday it happened & did not hear any thing of it till the  licking was all over. I however gave out my intention of fighting the senior who had licked him in the Green & especially as he said he should if he pleased do the same again, the fight did not however take place as myself and Rich (the Captain) were sent for to Liddells & after a long discussion, in which both Mr Weare & Mr Liddell took my part saying he had no right to touch, or order in any way a TB, Mr Liddell said he should shew it up to the Dean, he did & the QS were all called before him & after a long address during which (as had also been for some days) an expectation was fully entertained by all that the QS was about to be expelled. He was not however but received a severe reprimand & told that the next time such a thing happened expulsion would follow as a matter of course. Mr Liddell then confirmed the rule that the TBB & QSS are different & independent bodies, Rich having given me his word on the part of the QSS that such a thing should not again occur, we went before Liddell & told him so before the Dean addressed them, & which has I am happy to say been strictly attended to since.

C F Luttrell West